Altitude

My recent trip to Denver, Colorado, took me from the transcendent architecture of the Denver Art Museum to Larimer Square. Okay, can I ooh and ahh enough about lunch at rioja..? Just a few doors down from where I’m standing here.

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Heads up:

They call Denver the “Mile High City” for a reason.

My accommodation was situated at an altitude of 1,600 m and it took me (my head to be precise) about a day and a half to adjust.

 

 

From there it was smooth sailing. I even had some time and the opportunity to enjoy the people, vistas, food and climate here.

Happy travels everyone!

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Forest bathing…

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Hello, fellow friends and travelers,

A recent article in a German magazine has me thinking about great words that do not exist in the English language.

Here are a few of my favorites:

For the tree hugger:  Shinrin-yoku – Japanese, for “forest bathing,” the “practice of taking a short leisurely visit to a forest for health benefits” (Wikipedia: forest bathing)

For Santa and his helpers, a unit of measurement: Poronkusema – Finnish for “the distance a reindeer could travel before stopping to urinate” (Wikipedia: poronkusema)

For the currently stationary traveler: Fernweh – German for the ache / longing to travel or get far away.

For the budget-conscious: Prozvonit – Czech for initiating a cell phone call and only letting it ring once, so the other person has to call back and you can save on minutes. (See Wiktionary).

And finally, for the art lover: Duende -Spanish for “having soul, a heightened state of emotion, expression and authenticity” (Wikpedia: duende), i.e. the power that a work of art can have to deeply move a person.

Happy travels!

 

 

 

Fountains

Hello, fellow travelers and friends,

Fellow blogger Polianthus inspired me to partake in his monthly fountain challenge. After all, what’s not to love about fountains? I even have one in my backyard. Although it doesn’t look anything like this…

 

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Fountain in Rome

 

… it has become a gathering place for all types of birds and a “watering spot” for cats and racoons.  While I enjoy the sounds of water falling, I return to the fountains of Rome.

Ciao – TT

 

 

Free…lancing

Hola, fellow adventurers and friends! I hope, life is treating you well.

In a recent conversation with a friend and fellow freelancer, we agreed that freelancing has been the right approach for both of us. Sometimes we need to remind ourselves, right? Neither one of us could imagine working 9-5, reporting to a boss, being told what to do, etc.

We enjoy not knowing in advance, what each work day may (or may not) bring. We like (or can deal with) irregular schedules. We don’t mind tight deadlines (well…) and thrive on the surprise factor of last-minute trips for conference interpretation assignments (Can you be in … tomorrow?). We’ve learned to juggle and arrange our personal and professional lives to accommodate ups and downs, stress and financial instability in exchange for adventure, independence and freedom.

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I think, Joel Klettke said it nicely:

“Don’t freelance to make a living – freelance to make a life…”

Freelancing quotes

 

Lost in translation

Hi everyone,

It’s a new year! Hopefully, you also started yours with renewed energy and insights gained from a relaxing break. Recent talk about Google’s latest “neural machine translation,” and A.I. (artificial intelligence) had me reading up on some of the advances and issues that may impact my profession.

Doom and gloom talk of translators (written texts) and interpreters (spoken language) being replaced by computers/machines has abounded for decades. Early on in my career, over 25 years ago, some people advised me against taking this path, arguing that in the near future computers would be able to translate. Well, I didn’t believe it back then, and I still don’t.

Granted, we have come a long way with machine translation (MT) and other language-related computerized systems such as voice recognition. These days, many translators and interpreters benefit from using various computer technologies to assist in translation processes. These technologies do help us to translate more quickly and accurately. But in the final analysis, can machine translation really replace human translation? The simple answer is still “no,”  and here is why: Computers cannot truly grasp meaning, because they lack consciousness. Since they are unable to understand or be conscious of themselves and others in the world, they cannot fully grasp the meaning of written or spoken language.

Good! I for one am looking forward to a productive and interesting year!

For more on this, I recommend this Economist Technology Quarterly article: http://www.economist.com/technology-quarterly/2017-05-01/language

and this December article in the NY Times: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/14/magazine/the-great-ai-awakening.html?_r=0

Happy New Year! Your Traveling Translator

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